My Thoughts on The Music Industry

As someone who has been performing, writing, working on music ever since she was a child, and years trying to break into the music industry, I would like to give some important, valuable advice and suggestions that I’ve gain throughout the years to young performers out there who are thinking about stepping into this industry with the only and most precious and priceless thing they have. Talent.

Here are my thoughts:

In today’s music industry, when you’re first starting out your music career journey, “they” look for how much money you have, instead of the actual talent. Isn’t talent more important then some stupid, dirty money? What if you don’t have thousands of dollars to put in towards your career, what do you do? if you have talent, passion, determination and can’t afford to get discovered? If I was a record producer, I would look for the talent, the passion, and the heart that a person has for music, instead of ripping them off with cash. I mean you can’t really buy talent, ether you are born with it, or not!

I don’t like the fact that today’s music business is mainly about “money.” What about all of those struggling talented street musicians out there who have big dreams? Unfortunately, they never get to make it. It only happens to one in a million, but why??!! Is it because they were not born lucky enough? Just because they can’t afford to get discovered, they are not worth it?

FACT: In this century money answers all the questions. Sadly, but true.

Being discovered on YouTube happens only to one in a million, and even then, unless you can sing like Mariah Carey and/or dance like Michael Jackson and have some sort of a budget, no one is going to work with you for free. Recording a professional demo or an EP album costs between $5,000 to $30,000, depending on how of a professional press kit you’re going for. Now a days A&R and record companies are looking for original materials, it’s not professional to record demo covers anymore. And when it comes to technology, Pro Logic software can costs between $200 to $500, Pro Tools costs between $300 to $2,500, a professional mic with all its accessories can cost up to $1,000 to $3,000, professional photoshoot for your promo press kit can cost between $1,000 up to $5000, and also license fees, album designing fees, and any other expenses that you might have. Basically, what I’m trying to say is that, nothing ever happens for free, especially in show-business.

And when it comes to recording in a professional recording studio, sessions start from $90 an hour + musicians and producers fee. So as you can imagine, it’s not that easy being an aspiring struggling artist now a day’s who’s trying to get their music heard… Unless of course, you come from a wealthy family or you have a sponsor, then that’s a whole other story.

Be careful who you trust!
A few years back, I met someone in the music business who said he’d “help” me with my music career. He talked for hours and hours way too much nonsense, sounded very suspicious, and just to good to be true. I never contacted him back since then. I honestly, don’t trust those kind of people. Never have, never will!

NOTE: To all you aspiring struggling artists out there: please be careful who you trust! Don’t believe everybody who say’s they want to help you, they obviously don’t! They are a lot of bad, negative people out there who want to take advantage of you, specially in this shady business. You got to be smart and have brains, because other wise if you are naive, it will lead you to a very negative world, and you don’t want that! Just believe in your heart and trust your gut! Your gut will never lie, trust me! If something in you says you can’t trust a person, then don’t! as simple as that. Don’t ever let other people take advantage of you! Be positive and smart!

And ladies, while a few known artists have “slept their way” into something, 50% have not. So if someone is telling you that’s the way it’s done, tell them to go to hell! While there are exceptions, most professionals in the music industry and companies that have been in the industry for ten years or more, are honest and legitimate. So, make sure to work with an established company, trust your instincts, and you should be fine.

This article originally appeared on Medium

Published by Irma Laliashvili

Irma Laliashvili is a fashion and culture journalist and writer based in Denver, Colorado. She has been published in The Odyssey, The Metropolitan, Medium, and more. Irma holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Journalism from Metropolitan State University of Denver. She has a strong focus in editorial and digital media with concentrations in fashion, the arts, culture and travel. She loves writing long-form first-person lifestyle and opinion pieces, memoirs, as well as, shorter web content, news stories, and words on all things fashion and culture. Irma also runs a fashion and lifestyle blog called Irma’s Got Style. She is interested in reporting, writing and editing through freelance opportunities or permanent positions.

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